My house isn’t warm enough when it’s really cold outside. So I bake a lot of bread in the winter, because that gives me an excuse to stand near the stove for a couple of hours.

High-rising, sweet-tasting Anadama bread

High-rising, sweet-tasting Anadama bread

If we’re not eating carbs, I give the bread to neighbors, friends, whoever. Even, and especially, people I’ve just met.

Anadama is sweet and light and easy to love. You can make a no-knead version or use the bread machine. You’ll be warm, and everyone who eats this bread will say nice things to you. That’s how you win winter.

 

Anadama Bread
I always thought Anadama was Southern, but several sources seem to say it originated in New England.
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Ingredients
  1. 1/4 cup yellow cornmeal
  2. 1/2 cup boiling water
  3. 2 teaspoons (1 package) yeast
  4. 1/2 cup warm water (about 100-115 degrees)
  5. 1/4 cup molasses
  6. 2 tablespoons butter or margarine, softened
  7. 1 teaspoon salt
  8. 2 1/2 to 3 cups bread flour or all-purpose flour
  9. Butter or margarine for the top of the loaf
Instructions
  1. Combine the cornmeal and boiling water. Let cool.
  2. In a large bowl, dissolve the yeast in the water water and let stand about 5 minutes until foamy. Add the molasses, butter, salt and cornmeal mixture. Stir in the bread flour until a stiff dough forms.
  3. Knead for about 5 minutes until the dough is smooth and elastic. Lightly butter or oil the outside of the dough and let it rise for 45 minutes to 1 hour until roughly doubled in size. Shape the dough into a ball. Set it in a greased pie dish. Let it rise until doubled. Bake at 375 degrees for 30 to 35 minutes until golden. The loaf should sound hollow when tapped. A thermometer should read 195 degrees.
Adapted from Great Whole Grain Breads
Adapted from Great Whole Grain Breads
The Project Kitchen http://theprojectkitchen.com/